Find Paralegal Certificate Schools in Louisiana

Why Do You Want to Become a Paralegal in Louisiana?

Louisiana paralegal working with attorneyWhen preparing to interview for a Paralegal job in Louisiana, it’s advantageous to reflect on questions you could be asked. One of the questions that recruiters often ask Paralegal prospects is “What drove you to select law as a profession?”. What the interviewer is hoping to uncover is not only the personal reasons you may have for becoming a Paralegal, but additionally what qualities and abilities you have that make you exceptional at your profession. You will probably be asked questions relating primarily to law, along with a certain number of standard interview questions, so you need to prepare several ideas about how you want to answer them. Considering there are several factors that go into selecting a career, you can address this primary question in a variety of ways. When readying an answer, attempt to include the reasons the work interests you in addition to the strengths you possess that make you an exceptional Paralegal and the best candidate for the position. Don’t make an effort to memorize a response, but jot down a few concepts and anecdotes that pertain to your own strengths and experiences. Going over sample answers can help you to prepare your own thoughts, and give you ideas of what to include to enthuse the interviewer.

Considering Paralegal School in Louisiana?

Louisiana

Louisiana (/luˌiːziˈænə/ ( listen), /ˌluːzi-/ ( listen))[a] is a state in the southeastern region of the United States. It is the 31st in size and the 25th most populous of the 50 United States. Louisiana's capital is Baton Rouge and its largest city is New Orleans. It is the only state in the U.S. with political subdivisions termed parishes, which are the local government's equivalent to counties. The largest parish by population is East Baton Rouge Parish, and the largest by total area is Plaquemines. Louisiana is bordered by Arkansas to the north, Mississippi to the east, Texas to the west, and the Gulf of Mexico to the south.

Much of the state's lands were formed from sediment washed down the Mississippi River, leaving enormous deltas and vast areas of coastal marsh and swamp.[10][self-published source] These contain a rich southern biota; typical examples include birds such as ibis and egrets. There are also many species of tree frogs, and fish such as sturgeon and paddlefish. In more elevated areas, fire is a natural process in the landscape, and has produced extensive areas of longleaf pine forest and wet savannas. These support an exceptionally large number of plant species, including many species of orchids and carnivorous plants.[10] Louisiana has more Native American tribes than any other southern state, including four that are federally recognized, ten that are state recognized, and four that have not yet received recognition.[11]

Some Louisiana urban environments have a multicultural, multilingual heritage, being so strongly influenced by a mixture of 18th-century French, Spanish, Native American, and African cultures that they are considered to be exceptional in the US. Before the American purchase of the territory in 1803, the current Louisiana State had been both a French colony and for a brief period, a Spanish one. In addition, colonists imported numerous African people as slaves in the 18th century. Many came from peoples of the same region of West Africa, thus concentrating their culture. In the post-Civil War environment, Anglo-Americans increased the pressure for Anglicization, and in 1921, English was for a time made the sole language of instruction in Louisiana schools before a policy of multilingualism was revived in 1974.[12][13] There has never been an official language in Louisiana, and the state constitution enumerates "the right of the people to preserve, foster, and promote their respective historic, linguistic, and cultural origins."[12]

Louisiana was named after Louis XIV, King of France from 1643 to 1715. When René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle claimed the territory drained by the Mississippi River for France, he named it La Louisiane.[14] The suffix -ana (or -ane) is a Latin suffix that can refer to "information relating to a particular individual, subject, or place." Thus, roughly, Louis + ana carries the idea of "related to Louis." Once part of the French Colonial Empire, the Louisiana Territory stretched from present-day Mobile Bay to just north of the present-day Canada–United States border, including a small part of what is now the Canadian provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan.

Other Cities in Louisiana

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